state of the artery

head and heart

“Years ago I learned a very cool thing about Robin Williams, and I couldn’t watch a movie of his afterward without thinking of it. I never actually booked Robin Williams for an event, but I came close enough that his office sent over his rider. For those outside of the entertainment industry, a rider lists out an artist’s specific personal and technical needs for hosting them for an event, anything from bottled water and their green room to sound and lighting requirements. You can learn a lot about a person from their rider. This is where rocks bands list their requirement for green M&Ms (which is actually a surprisingly smart thing to do). This is also where a famous environmentalist requires a large gas-guzzling private jet to fly to the event city, but then requires an electric or hybrid car to take said environmentalist to the event venue when in view of the public.
When I got Robin Williams’ rider, I was very surprised by what I found. He actually had a requirement that for every single event or film he did, the company hiring him also had to hire a certain number of homeless people and put them to work. I never watched a Robin Williams movie the same way after that. I’m sure that on his own time and with his own money, he was working with these people in need, but he’d also decided to use his clout as an entertainer to make sure that production companies and event planners also learned the value of giving people a chance to work their way back. I wonder how many production companies continued the practice into their next non-Robin Williams project, as well as how many people got a chance at a job and the pride of earning an income, even temporarily, from his actions. He was a great multiplier of his impact. Let’s hope that impact lives on without him. Thanks, Robin Williams- not just for laughs, but also for a cool example.”

—   Brian Lord.org  (via boysncroptops)

(Source: gypsy-hip, via mostlysignssomeportents)

eleanasound:

The Last Japanese Mermaids 

For nearly two thousand years, Japanese women living in coastal fishing villages made a remarkable livelihood hunting the ocean for oysters and abalone, a sea snail that produces pearls. They are known as Ama. The few women left still make their living by filling their lungs with air and diving for long periods of time deep into the Pacific ocean, with nothing more than a mask and flippers.

In the mid 20th century, Iwase Yoshiyuki returned to the fishing village where he grew up and photographed these women when the unusual profession was still very much alive. After graduating from law school, Yoshiyuki had been given an early Kodak camera and found himself drawn to the ancient tradition of the ama divers in his hometown. His photographs are thought to be the only comprehensive documentation of the near-extinct tradition in existence

"You’re like the biggest career woman I know. You won’t even let me mute C-SPAN during sex."

(Source: alisonnbries)

You’re naive. Welcome to politics.

(Source: adumbscotts)

kristine-claire:

Happy Father’s Day 😁

kristine-claire:

Happy Father’s Day 😁

(Source: gatissmark)

wmagazine:

Love in the Trenches
Photograph by Robert Maxwell; styled by Ryan Hastings; W magazine June/ July 2014. 

wmagazine:

Love in the Trenches

Photograph by Robert Maxwell; styled by Ryan Hastings; W magazine June/ July 2014. 

jabletown:

The Stars Of ‘X-Men: Days Of Future Past' Play Fuck, Marry, Kill +

PETER!

(Source: xmendaily)

ladiesloveloki:

on-a-silver-wing:

vodka-vortexx:

funny celebrity equations

these all work…

I laughed harder at this than I should have…

(Source: owl-vortex, via cooknut)